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're the best environment for the talent spent before we go to questions, jay, then i want to talk about campaign financing. >> so you're looking at california right now, and that massive increase in the cost of gasoline, when matt said, when consumers are paying for gasoline they are not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. so what's happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulations that impact the energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the cost of energy. we've got to have that same focus and discussion here in washington. because what's happening in california can happen all across this country. >> hawaii, i heard -- >> when we do the big deal everybody thinks we have to do entitlements and defends on one side and taxes on the other. if you have a school pashtuns do with two legs he usually falls over. if we look at what the canadians did with their cash cow, we have more cash cow in energy than any of them. and we can do spending. we can do taxes, and we can to energy which is our cash cow if we go to and you can make a re
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. . . >> clayton: all right. 50 years ago this week, the world's most famous spy hit the big screen. >> i admire your luck, mr. -- >> bond, james bond. >> my name is bond, james bond. >> when was the last shipment? >> oh, lazzenby, i'm sorry. >> alisyn: and a half century later the most celebrated spy, in the movies he has it better than spies in real life. he was an of james bond, an mi-6, and spy catcher novel, dunn, matthew dunn. >> clayton: matthew, welcome to the show. >> good morning. >> clayton: it looks glamorous, bond over the years. help us separate fact from fiction here, although i think we might prefer the fiction side of it, but you guys are in the trenches doing the real deal.
and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particularly my colleague, steve coll, who has a recent book published by brookings about feeling betrayed about muslim attitudes which is an excellent book but also the fact the we did the september 27 to october 2nd w
, because businesses and wall street needs clarity and direction and for some time it's been an environment of uncertainty. it's why you've seen stagnant in the employment numbers. gdp at 1.3%. the fed is keeping the interest rates very low now in order to make sure there's a backdrop for economic growth and expansion. we need fiscal leadership out of washington to basically say which way the economy will go. >> you mentioned wall street, what wall street doesn't like is uncertainty. but does wall street -- i think the traditional thinking is, well, wall street, when a republican is elected, they kind of like that, because they generally view that as being a pro business person in office. and generally a democrat bringing more regulation perhaps, which wall street might not like. is that a fair assumption? >> i would say so, to a certain degree. we need regulation, but not overregulation. if you look at a lot of surveys of the fortune 500 ceos now, a lot of them are saying there's too much regulation and there's more to come down the road with franks. franks will present five new government
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)